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“Study Nature, love Nature, stay close to Nature. It will never fail you.” – Frank Lloyd Wright.

Immersing yourself in nature has many benefits: decreased stress, increased brain functioning, and an overall feeling of happiness and well being. The more time you spend in nature, camping, glamping, hunting, fishing, climbing, biking and hiking, the less risk you may have for a wide variety of diseases too. Anyone who’s spent time camping under the stars knows this. There are many trustworthy studies that echo this same sentiment.

But what are the real reasons to go camping, when you could just sit in your backyard instead?

“Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.” – Albert Einstein.

  1. Bonding with friends and family outside, in totally new surroundings.
  2. Sunshine! Vitamin D baby!
  3. Practical life skills – teach them to your kids and hone them for yourself.
  4. Problem solving.
  5. Losing track of time.
  6. Waking up to birds chirping and if you’re lucky, the sound of a creek flowing.
  7. Elk, moose, owls and other majestic wildlife sightings.
  8. Making camp comfy.
  9. Becoming a campsite gourmet – or not.
  10. The warmth and beauty of a real camp fire. That you made, with sticks.
  11. Fishing with sticks.
  12. Eating marshmallows on sticks.
  13. Sleeping under the stars.
  14. Even better, seeing a lot of shooting stars.
  15. Really funny stories you’ll retell for the rest of your life.
  16. Camping creates space and time to think, uninterrupted.
  17. Cool camping gear. It’s true. comfortable, sturdy, reliable, awesome camping gear, like a Sheridan Tent canvas wall tent or teepee, make all the difference. Add a pipe stove and you’ll never want to go home again. Trust us on this.

“The mountains are calling and I must go.” – John Muir.

Bottom line, camping helps you press the reset button. It clears out the cobwebs in our brains and for many of us, puts us in a state of flow that can result in big thinking and creating a new level of happiness in our lives, long after we’ve left the camp site.

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